General Permit: Antifouling Paint Contaminated Wash Water

Introduction
Contact (licensing)
Text of general permit
Forms
Supplementary materials

Introduction

Most boats that travel on tidal rivers, bays, and oceans have antifouling paint applied to the submerged portion of the boat's hull.  Antifouling paints are pesticides that prevent algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine life from attaching to the boat and generally protect the boat from marine life that could be destructive.  On a regular basis, boats are dry docked or hauled out of the water to be serviced.  Typically, boatyards and marinas will use high pressure water sprayers to rinse the salt water off and quickly remove dirt and any marine growth on the boat.  Along with the dirt and marine growth, antifouling paint can also be washed off, resulting in wash water containing not only dirt and marine organisms, but pesticides as well.

When antifouling paint is washed off, toxic pollutants are discharged  at levels that are much higher than the levels approved by the regulatory agencies as part of the normal use of the paint on boats.   Compounds such as copper, zinc and lead are used in antifouling products and have been found at high levels in boat bottom wash water

To reduce the levels of pollutants going into our waters, the DEP has issued a general permit to regulate the discharge of antifouling paint contaminated wash water.

Contact (licensing)

Text

Forms

Supplemental materials