HIV, STD, and Viral Hepatitis Program

The following links provide information about HIV, STDs, and viral hepatitis.   These are only some of the resources available.  If you have additional questions please contact one of our funded HIV or STD partners.

Looking for Information? - STD

  • Chlamydia
    • Most people who have chlamydia don’t know it since the disease often has no symptoms.
    • Chlamydia is the most commonly reported STD in the United States and in Maine.
    • Sexually active females 25 years old and younger need testing every year. ( US CDC Recommendation)
    • Easy to cure, chlamydia can impact a woman’s ability to have children if left untreated.
  • Gonorrhea
    • Anyone who is sexually active can get gonorrhea.
    • If they occur, symptoms in men and women vary depending on what part of the body is infected: Gonorrhea can affect the anus, eyes, mouth, genitals, or throat.
    • This disease can impact a woman’s ability to have children if left untreated.
  • Syphilis
    • The sexual behaviors that spread syphilis also spread other STDs, like HIV.
    • Syphilis is easy to cure in its early stages.
    • Signs and symptoms of syphilis include a firm, round, small, and painless sore on the genitals, anus, or mouth, or a rash on the body, especially on the palms of the hands or the soles of the feet.
  • Herpes
    • Genital herpes is a common STD, and most people with genital herpes infection do not know they have it.
    • You can get genital herpes even if your partner shows no signs of the infection.
    • If you have any symptoms (like a sore on your genitals, especially one that periodically recurs) laboratory tests can help determine if you have genital herpes.
    • There is no cure for herpes, but treatment is available to reduce symptoms and decrease the risk of transmission to a partner.
  • HPV
    • Genital human papillomavirus (also called HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI).
    • There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas of males and females.
      • These HPV types can also infect the mouth and throat.
    • Most people who become infected with HPV do not even know they have it.
    •  HPV is not the same as herpes or HIV (the virus that causes AIDS). These are all viruses that can be passed on during sex, but they cause different symptoms and health problems.
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
    • PID can lead to serious consequences including infertility.
    • PID occurs when certain bacteria, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea, move upward from a woman's vagina or cervix (opening to the uterus) into her reproductive organs.
    • Women can protect themselves from PID by taking action to prevent STDs or by getting early treatment if they have any genital symptoms such as vaginal discharge, burning during urination, abdominal or pelvic pain, pain during sexual intercourse, or bleeding between menstrual cycles.
    • Prompt and appropriate treatment of PID can help prevent complications, including permanent damage to female reproductive organs.
  • Trichomoniasis  (“Trich”)
    • Is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) that is easy to cure.
    • The infection often has no symptoms although women are more likely than men to get symptoms. You may notice an unusual genital discharge.
    • Without treatment, trichomoniasis can increase a person’s risk of acquiring HIV.
    • Pregnant women with trichomoniasis can deliver premature, low birth weight babies.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)
    • Any woman can get BV.
    • Some women with BV don't know they have it because they have no symptoms.
    • Women who have never had sexual intercourse may also be affected by BV, and it is common in pregnant women.
    • Having BV can increase a woman's susceptibility to other STDs. Pregnant women may deliver premature or low birth-weight babies
  • STDs and Pregnancy
    • When a woman is pregnant STDs can be more serious for her and her baby.
    • A pregnant woman with an STD can infect her baby before, during, or after the baby’s birth.
    • She may also have early labor or early rupture of the membranes surrounding the baby in the uterus.
    • Pregnant women should ask their doctors about getting tested for STDs, since some doctors do not routinely perform these tests.
  • STDs and Infertility
    • Chlamydia and gonorrhea are important preventable causes of infertility.
    • Untreated, about 10-15% of women with chlamydia will develop pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).
    • Chlamydia can also cause fallopian tube infection without any symptoms. PID and “silent” infection in the upper genital tract may cause permanent damage to the fallopian tubes, uterus, and surrounding tissues, which can lead to infertility.
    • Most women infected with chlamydia or gonorrhea have no symptoms.
    • US CDC recommends annual chlamydia screening for all sexually active females 25 and under and for women older than 25 with risk factors such as a new sex partner or multiple partners.

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